The Writing on the Cow: Cute Animal Inscriptions for Springtime!

We’re feeling full of the joys of spring today, so it seemed a good time to hunt for some of our favourite spring-themed inscriptions… And when I say spring-themed, yes, I’m talking cute animals!

1. A Late Bronze Age clay cow figurine with a Cypro-Minoan inscription on its side and a pattern of cross-hatching on its forehead.

CM cow side and head.jpg

Image courtesy of Silvia Ferrara.

Cypro-Minoan is a syllabic script of ancient Cyprus (in use between the 16th and 10th centuries BC), related to Linear A and Linear B. It is undeciphered, so unfortunately we do not know what the short text on the side of this cow says. This is the only example of a Cypriot clay figurine with an inscription, but Cypro-Minoan texts are found on a wide variety of different objects.

(Technically, we should really call this little chap a zebu, which is a type of bovid with more raised shoulders.) Continue reading “The Writing on the Cow: Cute Animal Inscriptions for Springtime!”

Just can’t get enough of edible ancient inscriptions?

Team Cuneiform (@cooleiform) tweeted us yesterday with a picture of their cuneiform cookies in the latest episode of ancient baking. And delicious they look too!

Team Cuneiform cookies.jpg

I’ll also take this opportunity to mention our colleague Anna Judson, a fellow researcher in Cambridge who is an expert in making cakes of ancient inscriptions (in this case I can testify to their deliciousness, having been on the receiving end many times!).

Here’s one example, a very early Cypro-Minoan inscription in a gorgeously lemony edible manifestation, made for a conference I organised in 2015 (see more on Anna’s blog HERE):

Anna CM0 small.jpg

And another, a Lycian inscription turned into chocolate traybake heaven, made for some Lycian language classes I ran last year (see more on Anna’s blog HERE):

Anna Lycian small.jpg

Don’t forget to share your own creations with us. They don’t have to be as elaborate as Anna’s cakes! Cookies and cupcakes are good places to start – and if you need any inspiration, you can look back over the CREWS blog or get in touch. Email us at crews@classics.cam.ac.uk or find us on Twitter (@crewsproject), where you may also want to use the hashtag #ancientbaking. We’d love to see what you make!